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Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco

Directed by: James Crump | 2018 | 1h 35m | Unrated

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O Cinema Wynwood

90 NW 29th Street, Miami (305) 571-9970

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• Adults – $11.00
• Older Adults (62+ years old w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Students & Teachers (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Children (12 years old & under) – $9.50
• Military (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• O Cinema Members – $7.50
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Antonio Lopez was the most influential fashion illustrator of 1970s New York and Paris. He was known for discovering talents such as Pat Cleveland, Grace Jones and Jerry Hall. In this fascinating doc, filmmaker James Crump takes us back to the swinging seventies when fashion designers and their entourages gained the prominence of rock stars.

A native of Puerto Rico and raised in The Bronx, Antonio was a seductive arbiter of style and glamour who, beginning in the 1960s, brought elements of the urban street and ethnicity to bear on a postwar fashion world desperate for change and diversity.

The film explores the intimate relationship between Antonio and Karl Lagerfeld, while unpacking Lagerfeld’s deep-seated rivalry with Yves Saint Laurent. Interviews with Grace Coddington, Jessica Lange, Bill Cunningham and many others bring this crucial chapter of fashion history to vivid life.

Winner DOC NYC Grand Jury Prize.

“A colourful documentary which revels in the eye candy of Lopez’s bright, expressive drawings along with an abundance of fashion photography.”
– CINEVUE

“The Picasso of fashion is given his deserving due in this irresistibly seductive documentary, chronicling his inspirational-and very wild-life in the jungle of style.”
– FILM JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL

“While the film seeks to put Antonio’s name on the same level as the boldfaced names he rubbed elbows with, it is a stark, sorrowful reminder of the many artistic geniuses cut down in their prime by AIDS.”
– LOS ANGELES TIMES