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Art Films presents… Wojnarowicz

Directed by: Chris McKim | 2020 | 1h 45m | Unrated

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FREE SCREENING: 5/19
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Additional information

THIS EVENT IS FREE TO THE PUBLIC!
All attendees must RSVP before 4:00pm on May 19th to participate.
Registered attendees will receive an email at 6:45pm with a screening link & password to view the film, as well as a link to join in on the post-film Q&A discussion.

**PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A VIRTUAL SCREENING ONLY AND WILL NOT BE TAKING PLACE AT OUR SOUTH BEACH THEATER**

With the Support Of

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Co-presented by O Cinema and Oolite Arts,
Art Films presents the best of films by and about artists, followed by a post-film discussion. This edition will feature a FREE online screening of WOJNAROWICZ on Wednesday, May 19th @ 7:00pm, followed by a post-film discussion with director Chris McKim & Oolite Arts Cinematic Arts Manager Danielle Bender.

Wojnarowicz: F**k You F*ggot F**ker is a fiery and urgent documentary portrait of downtown New York City artist, writer, photographer, and activist David Wojnarowicz. As New York City became the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, Wojnarowicz weaponized his work and waged war against the establishment’s indifference to the plague until his death from it in 1992 at the age of 37. Exclusive access to his breathtaking body of work – including paintings, journals, and films – reveals how Wojnarowicz emptied his life into his art and activism. Rediscovered answering machine tape recordings and intimate recollections from Fran Lebowitz, Gracie Mansion, Peter Hujar, and other friends and family help present a stirring portrait of this fiercely political, unapologetically queer artist.

POST-FILM Q&A:

To join the post-film discussion (via Zoom) you’ll need to go HERE as soon as the film ends.

“Prominently features self-depictions taken from his copious audio and visual archives to evoke his life and work with a bracing, tragic sense of immediacy.”
– NEW YORKER