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Bad Lucky Goat

Directed by: Samir Oliveros | 2017 | 1h 26m | Unrated | In Creole w/ English Subtitles

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SCREENING ON 9/21

O Cinema South Beach

1130 Washington Ave, Miami Beach (786) 471-3269

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*TICKET RESERVATIONS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AUGUST 30th!*

THIS SCREENING IS FREE TO THE PUBLIC!
(All guests must RSVP if they want to guarantee their seat)

With the Support Of

*TICKET RESERVATIONS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AUGUST 30th!*
Co-presented by O Cinema and Oolite Arts, Art Films presents the best of films by and about artists. This screening of BAD LUCKY GOAT will be followed by a film discussion with Director Samir Oliveros & renowned film critic Rene Rodriguez.

After accidentally killing a bearded goat with their father’s truck, two incompatible teenagers embark on a journey of reconciliation and comedic misadventure along Colombia’s breathtaking Caribbean coast. With no money, brother and sister Corn and Rita must find a way to get the damaged truck fixed in time to pick up the tourists that will be staying at their family’s hotel. While struggling to conceal the accident, the siblings visit a butcher, rastafari drum makers, a pawn shop and even a witch doctor over the course of an amazing 24-hour odyssey around Port Paradise.

THE FILMMAKER

Samir Oliveros was born in Bogota, Colombia in June 1990. He studied film direction at the School Of Visual Arts in NY. After graduation, he launched a Kickstarter campaign that was successfully funded with just over 60K dollars, to shoot his first feature “Bad Lucky Goat,” shot in Old Providence in the Colombian Caribbean.

“There’s a whiff of The Gods Must Be Crazy whimsy wafting through Bad Lucky Goat, an affably quirky debut feature by Bogota, Colombia-based Samir Oliveros.”
– HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“The playful narrative careens from a series of exotic locales, from rastafari drum makers to a climactic cock fight, with a blend of naturalistic dialogue and magic realism that’s both charming and unpredictable. The vivid backdrop creates an infectious atmosphere to this lighthearted romp, which stands toe-to-toe with Ozu in its depiction of angsty kids at odds with their surroundings. Yet Oliveros manages to use the rich environment to imbue the proceedings with an otherworldly quality that tips into fantasy and creates the sense that anything could happen. It’s a genuine crowdpleaser….”
– INDIEWIRE