Loading Events

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot

Directed by: Gus Van Sant | 2018 | 1h 53m | Rated R

Purchase a ticket

Select your showtime below.

OPENS 7/27

O Cinema Miami Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

Additional information

• General Admission – $11.00
• Student / Senior / Military – $9.50
• Members – $7.50
All tickets are available online AND at the door.

All Miami Beach residents get 20% off General Admission tickets on the FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH @ O Cinema Miami Beach (with proof of residency)!

ALL FILMS START EXACTLY AT THE LISTED TIME, AND ALL TICKET SALES ARE FINAL. NO REFUNDS, NO EXCHANGES, NO EXCEPTIONS.

On the rocky path to sobriety after a life-changing accident, John Callahan discovers the healing power of art, willing his injured hands into drawing hilarious, often controversial cartoons, which bring him a new lease on life.

John Callahan (Joaquin Phoenix) has a lust for life, a talent for off-color jokes, and a drinking problem. When an all-night bender ends in a catastrophic car accident, the last thing he intends to do is give up drinking. But when he reluctantly enters treatment -with encouragement from his girlfriend (Rooney Mara) and a charismatic sponsor (Jonah Hill) -Callahan discovers a gift for drawing edgy, irreverent newspaper cartoons that develop an international following and grant him a new lease on life. Based on a true story, this poignant, insightful and often funny drama about the healing power of art is adapted from Callahan’s autobiography and directed by two-time Oscar nominee Gus Van Sant.

“What makes Phoenix’s performance especially exciting is that you’re watching not just a character go from chaos to self-possession but an actor, too.”
– VULTURE

“The movie radiates considerable compassion, sensitively addressing issues including addiction, recovery and forgiveness.”
– SCREEN INTERNATIONAL

“In a terrific performance that encompasses countless attitudinal, emotional and physical shifts, Joaquin Phoenix eases into the lead role with equal parts raw pain, ironic humor and eventual mellow acceptance.”
– HOLLYWOOD REPORTER