Loading Events

FREE SCREENING: F11 and Be There

Directed by: Jethro Waters | 2018 | 1h 24m | Unrated

Purchase a ticket

Select your showtime below.

Additional information

THIS VIRTUAL SCREENING IS FREE TO THE PUBLIC!

All attendees must RSVP before 4:00pm on May 3rd to participate.

Registered attendees will receive an email by 6:45pm with a screening link & password to view the film.

**PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A VIRTUAL SCREENING ONLY AND WILL NOT BE TAKING PLACE AT OUR SOUTH BEACH THEATER**

With the Support Of

We’re proud to partner with our friends at The Betsy Hotel on Miami Beach & FIU to offer a special presentation of the documentary, F11 AND BE THERE.
Thanks to their support, we’re able to offer this film to you for FREE on Monday, May 3rd @7:00pm (EST)!

F11 AND BE THERE is an Emmy nominated documentary film that explores civil rights, equality, race, social justice, photography and art through the life and artistic legacy of famed Life Magazine and Magnum Photos photographer Burk Uzzle. While traversing Uzzle’s 65+ year legacy, this documentary film finds its center in his contemporary portraiture work with African Americans in Eastern North Carolina. This film is a journey alongside one of America’s greatest visual poets as he makes museums exhibitions with a local community, travels America’s backroads in search of hidden treasures of Americana, and using his vast archive as a guide, confronts race, inequality, and injustice through the many parallels of the 20th and 21st centuries. F11 AND BE THERE is a historical document, a non-linear pastiche of a life well lived, a musically driven homage to craft and artistic process, and a love letter to one man’s life-long dedication to the idea of equality.

POST-FILM DISCUSSION:

Join us immediately following the screening of F11 AND BE THERE for a post-film discussion (via Zoom) with director Jethro Waters. The discussion will start promptly at 8:30pm (EST).

“The film is as beautifully composed as Uzzle’s pictures. The director Jethro Waters also shot the movie, a subtle feast of light and color. The animated sections illustrating Uzzle’s past, by Cable Hardin, consist of white lines drawn against a deep gray background, and work beautifully. The music by Natalie Prass and Eric Slick is propulsive.”
– NEW YORK TIMES