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Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

Directed By: Shlomi Elkabetz & Ronit Elkabetz | 2015 | 1 hr. 55 min | Unrated

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O Cinema North Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

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General Admission – $11.00
Student/ Senior – $9.50
Members – $7.50
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An uncompromising, heart-rending portrait of a woman’s struggle to overcome an unmoving patriarchy and live a life of her own design.

In Israel there is neither civil marriage nor civil divorce; only Orthodox rabbis can legalize a marriage or its dissolution. But this dissolution is only possible with full consent from the husband, who in the end has more power than the judges.

Viviane Amsalem (Ronit Elkabetz), an Israeli woman trapped in a loveless marriage, has been applying for a divorce from her cruel and manipulative husband for three years, but instead finds herself effectively put on trial by her country’s religiously-based marriage laws. His cold intransigence, her determination to fight for her freedom, and the ambiguous role of the judges shape a procedure in which tragedy vies with absurdity, and where everything is brought out for judgment, apart from the initial request.

Siblings Ronit and Shlomi Elkabetz bring their blistering trilogy of male domination in an Israeli family to a rewarding close with Gett, the Trial of Viviane Amsalem.
– VARIETY

The film never devolves into finger-wagging hysterics thanks to Ronit and brother/co-director Shlomi Elkabetz’s keen attention to their actors’ performances, especially Ronit’s star turn.
– VILLAGE VOICE

In the hands of sister-brother co-directors Ronit Elkabetz (who also co-stars) and Shlomi Elkabetz this patriarchal legal loophole becomes the wellspring for densely rich drama, told with stringent austerity but also humor and judicious empathy.
– HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Gripping cinema from start to finish, almost implausibly so.
– NEW YORK TIMES

A couple of plot turns threaten to overload the drama, but overall this divorce is more riveting than many a murder trial.
– NEW YORK POST

The acting, especially from Menash Noy as an ineffectual attorney, is phenomenal, resulting in a feminist knockout told in inverse.
– TIME OUT NEW YORK

This all might be laughable if it wasn’t based on the very real facts of the Israeli court system, which as portrayed here is like Kafka without the surrealist trappings.
– AV CLUB

Methodical and agonizing, much like the five-year dispute it depicts.
– NPR

The divorce-centered drama is so provocative it’s become a lightning rod for debate inside the country. Even watching from a distance is unnerving.
– LOS ANGELES TIMES

Almost all of the film takes place inside a courtroom, at irregular intervals over five years, but there is no sense of drag or slump; on the contrary, the action quivers with tension, impatience, comic heat, and, beneath it all, an irrepressible rage.
– NEW YORKER

[A] ferocious portrait of a woman who is desperately fighting Jewish religious dictates to regain her freedom from an arranged marriage.
– SCREEN INTERNATIONAL