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I Am Cuba

DIRECTED BY: MIKHAIL KALATOZOV | 1964 | 2H 20M | UNRATED | IN SPANISH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES

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O Cinema Miami Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

Additional information

• Adults – $11.00
• Older Adults (62+ years old w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Students & Teachers (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Children (12 years old & under) – $9.50
• Military (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• O Cinema Members – $7.50
(All tickets are available online and at the box office. Prices for special events and select screenings may vary. Please note ticket prices before you complete you purchase. All prices are subject to change without notice.)

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ALL FILMS START EXACTLY AT THE LISTED TIME, AND ALL TICKET SALES ARE FINAL. NO REFUNDS, NO EXCHANGES, NO EXCEPTIONS.

NEW 4K DIGITAL RESTORATION

Hidden away in the Soviet archives for three decades, I AM CUBA (SOY CUBA) is a wildly schizophrenic celebration of Communist kitsch, mixing Slavic solemnity with Latin sensuality — a whirling, feverish dance through both the sensuous decadence of Batista’s Havana and the grinding poverty and oppression of the Cuban people, garnered praise over the past two decades for its “death-defying” camera work with swooping dolly shots and long takes, all done before Steadicams and small helicopter cameras.  Recently restored from the original negative and looking more gorgeous than ever, I AM CUBA is not to be missed.

I AM CUBA (SOY CUBA) is one of the landmarks of world cinema, first revealed to American audiences 30 years after its production. Soviet director Mikhail Kalatozov, praised for THE CRANES ARE FLYING (1957), set out to create a Cuban film as powerful as Eisenstein’s BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN. The intent was for I AM CUBA to be a rallying point for Castro’s nascent revolution, a piece of cinematic propaganda that would espouse the virtues of the Soviet way of life and demonize capitalism.  The end results were not exactly what Cuba, Russia or the filmmakers had hoped for.

Mikhail Kalatozov’s wildly mobile, hallucinatory film was initially rejected by both Cuban and Soviet officials for excessive naiveté and an insufficiently revolutionary spirit, and went largely disregarded and almost unknown for nearly 30 years. In short- the Cuban audiences found it too esoteric and naive and the Russian audiences though it glamorized Pre-Castro Cuba a bit too much.  That all changed in the early nineties—a remarkable era in film culture, chock full of rediscoveries—when Tom Luddy programmed it at the Telluride Film Festival, and Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola co-presented a Milestone Films release.

I AM CUBA is a one-of-a-kind film experience, a visually mind-bending bolt from the historical blue.  As a piece of propaganda it might be a failure but as a singular, stunning work of cinematic art it is unparalleled.    Recently restored in 4K from the original negative, see I AM CUBA like you never have before.

“As an example of lyrical black and white filmmaking, it is still stunning. If you see it, try to figure out how the camera floated down that wall.”
– ROGER EBERT

“One of the most stylistically vigorous films of all time.”
– SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

“In a sense, it’s a movie about looking past surfaces to see what’s in front of you. It takes the time to look around and discovers majesty, beauty and pathos everywhere it turns.”
– LOS ANGELES TIMES

“It is a dream of life in which everything is reduced to black and white. Or as the rhetoric used to go, you are either part of the problem or part of the solution. Nothing was ever quite that simple.”
– NEW YORK TIMES

“The resulting assault is so epicly impassioned it’s less about Cuba per se than the fusillade of movement, shadow, light, vertigo, and landscape on the viewer’s tender optic nerves.”
– VILLAGE VOICE

“Audacious, thrilling, erotic (and in three languages, no less), I Am Cuba is a lost masterpiece of filmmaking finally seeing the light of day 30 years after its production.”
– AUSTIN CHRONICLE