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FREE SCREENING: Judas and the Black Messiah

Directed by: Shaka King | 2021 | 2h 6m | Rated R

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SCREENING 2/11
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THIS SCREENING IS FREE TO THE PUBLIC!

RSVP SPOTS ARE LIMITED AND DISTRIBUTED ON A FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVE BASIS.

Those that RSVP will be sent an email with the screening link to watch both the film and the Behind the Screens conversation with Elvis Mitchell and Shaka King. Further details will be included after RSVP.

The screening site is supported on all computers and Android mobile devices. Safari, Chrome and Firefox are the recommended browsers for computers. The site works on tablets (Safari or Firefox browsers only, not Chrome). It does not work on iPhones. Please note you cannot mirror or cast this site. However, you can connect your laptop to your TV using an HDMI-to-HDMI cable.

With the Support Of

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O Cinema invites you to an advanced virtual screening of JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH from Warner Bros. followed by a ‘Behind the Screens’ conversation with KCRW host Elvis Mitchell and Shaka King, the director of the film. Be the first to watch this film ahead of its release and get access to a special conversation between Elvis Mitchell and Shaka King!

FBI informant William O’Neal (LaKeith Stanfield) infiltrates the Illinois Black Panther Party and is tasked with keeping tabs on their charismatic leader, Chairman Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya). A career thief, O’Neal revels in the danger of manipulating both his comrades and his handler, Special Agent Roy Mitchell (Jesse Plemons). Hampton’s political prowess grows just as he’s falling in love with fellow revolutionary Deborah Johnson (Dominique Fishback). Meanwhile, a battle wages for O’Neal’s soul. Will he align with the forces of good? Or subdue Hampton and The Panthers by any means, as FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover (Martin Sheen) commands?

 

“As such, cinema is part of a cultural warfare without bloodshed, in turn making the stories portrayed, and how they are portrayed, inherently political. And if cinema is political, Shaka King has made a manifesto.”
– THE WRAP

“Memorialized for his tragic death, [Fred Hampton] is reclaimed here as a figure of boisterous, defiantly big-hearted life.”
– LOS ANGELES TIMES

“Mostly, though, it’s Kaluuya and Stanfield – two actors who seem destined to be hailed for career-best turns with every subsequent project – who make “Judas and the Black Messiah” such an incendiary watch.”
– INDIEWIRE

“Black Messiah’s center of gravity has to be a Hampton you can’t look away from, and Kaluuya — alternately raw, tender, and incendiary — duly electrifies every scene he’s in. Righteous as the road may be, his Fred hasn’t been flattened to fit the broad Wikipedia-worn contours of a martyr or a hero; he lives and breathes, down to the last indelible frame.”
– ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY