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Matt Shepard is a Friend of Mine

Directed by: Michele Josue | 2015 | 1h 29m | Unrated

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General Admission – $11.00
Student / Senior – $9.50
Members – $7.50
General Admission tickets are available online AND at the door.
Student and Senior tickets are ONLY available at the door.
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*FILMS WILL START EXACTLY AT THE LISTED TIME*

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On October 7, 1998, University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard was brutally beaten, tied to a fence and left to die because he was gay.

Years later, Michele Josue, a close friend of Matt’s, revisits the shocking case with never-before-seen photos, rare video footage, as Matt’s all-too-brief life is remembered through the vivid testimonies of those whose lives he touched, from the friends and family who knew him best to the bartender who saw him on the night of the attack. New revelations emerge in one of the most notorious hate crimes in US history, leading to a searing, poignant, and multi-layered biographical and sociological portrait. In the end, the notion of forgiveness–embodied in the moving and courageous final act of Matt’s parents–takes on truly heroic proportions.

 

Seeks to restore the Matt Shepard of his friends’ and family’s memories, and in so doing return a human symbol to a state of ordinary but beloved individuality.
– NEW YORK TIMES

Josue revisits his life and death with heart-wrenching effectiveness, but even in the recollections of his closest friends, Shepard remains an elusive figure.
– VILLAGE VOICE

What lingers afterward is the haunting sense of someone who became an icon only because he was cheated of the opportunity to become himself.
– CHICAGO READER

Matt Shepard Is a Friend of Mine seeks to restore Shepard’s humanity to his name, to tell the story of the person who was murdered for being who he was.
– SLATE

Long-in-coming doc offers an intensely personal look behind the headlines.
– HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

The film is enough to prompt soul-searching among parents, educators and the LGBT community on how to provide adequate guidance and support for LGBT youths.
– LOS ANGELES TIMES

If the director wanted to rehumanize Shepard, she has succeeded. Her other goal, though worthwhile, was not so easy to accomplish: to make sense of a horrific event and move on.
– WASHINGTON POST

This heartbreaking documentary should be shown in every high school and college – and everywhere intolerance is suspected.
– NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

This film doesn’t just revisit an atrocity, it moves through it, and finds meaning in it.
– ROGEREBERT.COM