Loading Events

MBC Interactive Archive Project: Je T’Aime Moi Non Plus

Directed by: Serge Gainsbourg | 1976 | 1h 24m | Unrated | In French w/ English Subtitles

Purchase a ticket

Select your showtime below.

SPECIAL SCREENING: 5/5 @ 7pm
Purchase Tickets Now

O Cinema South Beach

1130 Washington Ave, Miami Beach (786) 471-3269

Additional information

• Adults – $10.00
• Older Adults (62+ years old w/ valid ID) – $8.00
• Students & Teachers (w/ valid ID) – $8.00
• O Cinema Members – $7.50
• MBFS Members – FREE
(All tickets are available online and at the box office. Prices for special events and select screenings may vary. Please note ticket prices before you complete your purchase. All prices are subject to change without notice.)

ALL FILMS START EXACTLY AT THE LISTED TIME, AND ALL TICKET SALES ARE FINAL. NO REFUNDS, NO EXCHANGES, NO EXCEPTIONS.

With the Support Of

PLEASE NOTE: This event has passed.

MBC Interactive Archive Project:
“Rebels of the 1970s”
JE TAIME, MOI NON PLUS
(Presented by the Miami Beach Film Society)

Inspired by their controversial pop hit song with the same name, music superstar Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin made this equally controversial film that became France’s biggest cult favorite. Birkin stars as a boyish wandering truck stop waitress who meets a “mostly gay” garbage truck driver (Joe Dallessandro). They enter a complex relationship that enrages the other partner (Hugues Quester) and stirs up a provocative picture of 1970s free but complicated love.

“Don’t bother going to see my film, see Gainsbourg’s. That is a work of art.”
– FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT

“Simply put, Je T’Aime Moi Non Plus is one crazy film and even after forty years, it retains the power to leave even the most jaded of moviegoers startled by the on-screen goings-on. At times reminiscent of a French take on the filmography of the late, great Russ Meyer, this meditation on sex, love, lust, death and misplaced machismo is one of those rare films that could comfortably screen in arthouses and grindhouses alike while arousing outrage (among other things) from the patrons of both. As a cinematic equivalent to Gainsbourg’s musical endeavors, it does cast an undeniable spell on viewers, and seeing two of the most distinctive sex symbols of the Seventies paired up together is certainly compelling.”
– PETER SOBCZYNSKI, ROGEREBERT.COM