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Mid90s

Directed by: Jonah Hill | 2018 | 1h 24m | Rated R

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O Cinema Miami Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

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• Adults – $11.00
• Older Adults (62+ years old w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Students & Teachers (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Children (12 years old & under) – $9.50
• Military (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
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Written and Directed by Jonah Hill, Mid90s follows Stevie, a thirteen-year-old in 90s-era LA who spends his summer navigating between his troubled home life and a group of new friends that he meets at a Motor Avenue skate shop.

Jonah Hill makes his directorial debut with this coming-of-age story about a teenage boy who finds his scene when he meets an eclectic group of neighbourhood skateboarders.
Trust Jonah Hill to make a coming-of-age story that’s wickedly irreverent and bursting with heart. The two-time Academy Award nominee’s singular gifts as an actor translate seamlessly into his debut as writer-director. Mid90s is goofy, intelligent, and tender – and it might have you eyeing that skateboard collecting dust in the garage.

Stevie (Sunny Suljic) is a sweet 13-year-old about to explode. His mom (Katherine Waterston) is loving and attentive, but a little too forthcoming about her romantic life. His big brother (Lucas Hedges) is a taciturn and violent bully. So Stevie searches his working-class Los Angeles suburb for somewhere to belong. He finds it at the Motor Avenue skate shop.

Stevie’s new friends are older and more experienced in everything that matters, like skateboarding, hip-hop, girls, and getting into trouble. Stevie seems so green but, disarmed by his earnestness and bravado – he’ll attempt even the most insane stunts in an effort to be accepted – the Motor Avenue crew welcomes him into their fold. Their friendship gives Stevie an unprecedented sense of worth. It also places him in ever-scarier situations.

Set to a connoisseur’s soundtrack of ’90s rock and rap, Mid90s captures the hijinks and hair-raising risk-taking of pre-digital-age teen life. Stevie’s pals can be obnoxious one moment and exceptionally kind (even wise) the next. Employing brilliantly timed jump-cuts and a surprisingly spare aesthetic that owes as much to François Truffaut as Judd Apatow, Hill proves to be a uniquely sophisticated chronicler of youthful folly while delivering some of the funniest scenes you’ll find on screen this year.

“As a writer and director, Hill demonstrates an endearing and encouraging empathy for his characters, crafting a portrait of adolescence that allows every emotion and every decision — from the most relatable at any age to the most boneheaded — to exist without irony, judgement, or condescension.”
– CONSEQUENCE OF SOUND

“Mid90s, though made by a Hollywood star, isn’t a nostalgic indie “fable” in gritty skate-punk drag. It’s something smaller and purer: a slice of street life made up of skittery moments that achieve a bone-deep reality.”
– VARIETY

“A gender-flipped sibling to Crystal Moselle’s Skate Kitchen (set in Los Angeles versus that film’s NYC), its narrative of sudden belonging and onrushing perils mirrors that Sundance entry. But in emotional punch and shoulda-seen-this-coming skill, it is more like Hill’s Lady Bird, a gem that feels simultaneously informed by its author’s adolescence and the product of a serious artist’s observational distance.”
– HOLLYWOOD REPORTER