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Oh Lucy!

Directed by: Atsuko Hirayanagi | 2018 | 1h 36m | Unrated | In Japanese w/ English Subtiles

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O Cinema Miami Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

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• General Admission – $11.00
• Student / Senior / Military – $9.50
• Members – $7.50
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Executive Producers Will Ferrell and Adam McKay present OH LUCY!, the story of a Tokyo office worker has her desires awakened in the quirkiest way in this comedic odyssey of desire, passion, and betrayal.

OH LUCY! follows Setsuko (Shinobu Terajima, in an Independent Spirit Award-nominated performance), a single, emotionally unfulfilled woman, seemingly stuck with a drab, meaningless life in Tokyo. At least until she’s convinced by her niece, Mika (Shioli Kutsuna), to enroll in an unorthodox English class that requires her to wear a blonde wig and take on an American alter ego named “Lucy.” The new identity awakens something dormant in Setsuko, and she quickly develops romantic feelings for her American instructor, John (Josh Hartnett). When John suddenly disappears from class, Setsuko travels halfway around the world in search of him, and in the outskirts of Southern California, family ties and past lives are tested as she struggles to preserve the dream and promise of “Lucy.”

“Hirayanagi isn’t selling a packaged idea about what it means to be human; she does something trickier and more honest here, merely by tracing the ordinary absurdities and agonies of one woman’s life.”
– NEW YORK TIMES

“Hirayanagi gives her lead respect by framing her specific dilemma in a way that feels sincere.”
– NPR

“Although Lucy is on a journey of self-discovery, she often hurts others in her quest for herself. That makes Hirayanagi’s take on the later-in-life coming-of-age story more honest than most.”
– WASHINGTON POST