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The House That Jack Built (Unrated Director’s Cut)

Directed by: Lars von Trier | 2018 | 2h 32m | Unrated

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O Cinema Wynwood

90 NW 29th Street, Miami (305) 571-9970

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• General Admission – $12.00
• O Cinema Members – $10.00
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Following a highly controversial festival run (starting in Cannes, where the screening prompted both praises and outraged reactions), Lars von Trier’s unrated director’s cut of THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT starring Matt Dillon, Uma Thurman and Riley Keough, will be screening at O Cinema Wynwood for one night only.

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT takes place in 1970s USA. We follow the highly intelligent Jack through 5 incidents and are introduced to the murders that define Jack’s development as a serial killer. We experience the story from Jack’s point of view. He views each murder as an artwork in itself, even though his dysfunction gives him problems in the outside world. Despite the fact that the final and inevitable police intervention is drawing ever near (which both provokes and puts pressure on Jack) he is – contrary to all logic – set on taking greater and greater chances. Along the way we experience Jack’s descriptions of his personal condition, problems and thoughts through a recurring conversation with the unknown Verge – a grotesque mixture of sophistry mixed with an almost childlike self-pity and in-depth explanations of, for Jack, dangerous and difficult maneuvers.

“The film becomes an even broader consideration of individual fascinations and follies, of ways of responding to art without the boundaries of morality and reason.”
– SLANT

“The House That Jack Built is an often-horrifying, sadistic dive into a psychotic internal monologue, with intellectual detours about the nature of art in the world today, and puts considerable effort into stimulating discomfort at key moments. If you meet the work on those terms, or at least accept the challenge of wrestling with impeccable filmmaking that dances across moral barriers, it’s also possibly brilliant.”
– INDIEWIRE