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The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Directed by: Joe Talbot | 2019 | 2h | Rated R

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O Cinema North Beach

500 71st St, Miami Beach (786) 207-1919

Additional information

• Adults – $11.00
• Older Adults (62+ years old w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Students & Teachers (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• Children (12 years old & under) – $9.50
• Military (w/ valid ID) – $9.50
• O Cinema Members – $7.50
(All tickets are available online and at the box office. Prices for special events and select screenings may vary. Please note ticket prices before you complete you purchase. All prices are subject to change without notice.)

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Jimmie Fails dreams of reclaiming the Victorian home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco. Joined on his quest by his best friend, Jimmie searches for belonging in a rapidly changing city that seems to have left them behind.

Jimmie Fails has one hope in life: to reclaim the majestic Victorian house his grandfather built. Every week, Jimmie and his only friend, Montgomery, make a pilgrimage across San Francisco to Jimmie’s dream home and imagine what life would be like if this neighborhood had never changed. When they realize the house’s current owners have moved out, Jimmie decides to recreate the home his family once had. As he struggles to reconnect with his family and reconstruct the community he longs for, Jimmie’s domestic aspirations blind him to reality.

Director/co-writer/composer Joe Talbot makes an astonishing feature debut, transfiguring one man’s intimate despair into a timely story that questions who has a rightful claim to a city’s identity. Inspired by the real-life story of Jimmie Fails, who plays a fictionalized version of himself, THE LAST BLACK MAN IN SAN FRANCISCO elegantly engages with a loss of cross-cultural connection as one individual seeks belonging in the new incarnation of his hometown.

“Like Barry Jenkins similarly set Medicine for Melancholy, The Last Black Man in San Francisco supplies positivity to the struggle.”
– TIME OUT

“[A] story that doesn’t announce its themes but instead transforms lived-in ideas about friendship, loneliness, artmaking, gentrification and the many faces of black masculinity.”
– NEW YORK TIMES

“The film team is so strong and the direction so fine that it’s simply hard to believe this is actually Talbot’s first full-length feature film. And to detail much more would spoil the genuine surprise of their many on-screen artistic contributions.”
– THE PLAYLIST

“Shot in a woozy, unreal, and dryly comedic style that splits the difference between Spike Jonze and Spike Lee, The Last Black Man in San Francisco slows the world down just enough for you to feel it changing.”
– INDIEWIRE

“This is bound to go down as one of the all-time-great San Francisco films.”
– ROGEREBERT.COM