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The Man Who Sold His Skin

Directed by: Kaouther Ben Hani | 2020 | 1h 49m | Unrated | In Arabic/English/French/Flemish w/ English subtitles

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• General Admission – $12.00

You will get access to watch on any internet-connected device, including laptops, tablets and smartphones, AppleTV, Chromecast , and more .

After you’ve entered your payment information, your rental period will start immediately and last for three days.

With the Support Of

These are challenging times for everyone and while we are reopening our South Beach theater, we know some of you aren’t ready just yet to come back into a theater and we totally understand. We’ll be waiting to greet you when you are! In the meantime, we will continue to offer a robust lineup of films to you virtually in addition to our in-person offerings!

Sam Ali left his country for Lebanon to escape the war. To be able to travel to Europe and live with the love of his life, he accepts having his back tattooed by one of the world’s most sulfurous contemporary artists.

NOMINATED FOR A 2021 ACADEMY AWARD FOR
‘BEST INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM’!

Sam Ali, a young sensitive and impulsive Syrian, left his country for Lebanon to escape the war. To be able to travel to Europe and live with the love of his life, he accepts having his back tattooed by one of the world’s most sulfurous contemporary artists. Turning his own body into a prestigious piece of art, Sam will come to realize that his decision might actually mean anything but freedom. Writer/director Kaouther Ben Hania (BEAUTY AND THE DOGS) offers a ferociously satirical look at politics, class and art filtered through a gripping story of a Faustian pact between the privileged and the damned, propelled by an excellent cast including Yahya Mahayni, Koen De Bouw and Monica Bellucci.

“On the whole, this is a stimulating work that highlights important issues and once again confirms Ben Hania as a rising talent.”
– VARIETY

“When it’s all over, the viewer gets to wrestle with everything everyone here does — the plight of Syria, the nature of art, “exploitation” and the nature of “freedom.” Not bad for the first Tunisian film much of the world will have ever had the chance to see.”
– MOVIENATION